Friday, July 17, 2020

The History of Mercedes-Benz

The History of Mercedes-Benz The history of Mercedes-Benz includes over a century of constant innovation in the face of adversity. Produced by Daimler AG, the Mercedes name has seen some of the darkest times in European history followed by some of the most innovative years in science and technology.The following article traces the history of Mercedes Benz from its innovative foundations through the trials of the World Wars and then into the prosperity of the 1950s and 1960s. The story of Mercedes-Benz is a history lesson that teaches perseverance, respect and, above all, the value of striving for continuous advancement in every area possible. © Shutterstock.com | BhakpongIn this article, you will learn about 1) the founders of Mercedes Benz (Gottlieb Daimler and Karl Benz), 2) Daimler Benz in WW2, 3) Daimler after the second world war, 4) the worldwide expansion of Daimler Benz, and 5) some interesting facts about its technology.GOTTLIEB DAIMLER AND KARL BENZThough they had never met, Gottlieb Daimler and Karl Benz each invented a high-speed engine in the 1880s. Gottlieb Daimler worked with his business partner, Wilhelm Maybach, to design what was to evolve into a modern gasoline engine in 1885. Around the same time in 1885, Karl Benz utilized bicycle technology and a four-stroke engine to begin the development of one of the first automobiles.After years of struggle with unstable business partners and demanding bank regulations, Karl Benz founded Benz Co Rheinische Gasmotoren-Fabrik in 1883. His company was often referred to as Benz Cie, and it was one of the first two automobile manufacturers established in Germany. K arl Benz was awarded a patent for his three-wheeled self-propelled Motorwagen in 1886. German patent #37435 changed transportation forever. Karls wife, Bertha, was an active part of many of his businesses after she bought out his former partners shares with her dowry. Bertha continued to help promote Karls inventions by taking his newly patented vehicle on an impromptu 120-mile trip. She was so involved in Karls business life that she knew the machine well enough to maintain it herself.Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft (DMG) was founded in 1890 by lifelong business partners Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach. The pair had invented a combustion engine in 1885 and the following year were successfully able to attach it to a motorcycle, a boat, and a stagecoach. Their engine was not only smaller than the previous engines, but it was also more powerful. After having achieved success with their early internal combustion engines, they were able to begin selling automobiles as early as 1892. D espite their success, Daimler and Maybach resigned from the business after experiencing difficulty with their shareholders. They both returned the organization in 1894. In 1900, Gottlieb Daimler passed away and left Maybach to run DMG. Maybach left DMG for the final time in 1907.Both companies continued operations during and after the First World War. However, they were both deeply affected by the German economic crisis that followed the Treaty of Versailles. During the war, most civilian development had come to a complete standstill as industry focused on creating armaments for the Prussian army. These local economic issues combined with the rise of motor companies overseas made business difficult for both Benz Cie and DMG. Germanys first two automotive companies entered an agreement to protect their mutual interests in 1924. This agreement was to be valid until the turn of the next century, the year 2000. However, the two companies decided to complete a total merger in the year 1 926, and Daimler-Benz was born. The new company christened their joint automobile project the Mercedes-Benz.DAIMLER-BENZ IN WORLD WAR IILike many companies, Daimler-Benz produced armament items at the behest of the government during World War II. After the invasion of Poland sparked hostilities across Europe, many of the Nazi ministries took hold of most of the German industrial facilities to begin to prepare for what they thought would be a very short war.Daimler-Benz began creating trucks and aircraft engines for the German military in 1936.Their current production facilities were not large enough to keep up with demand. Hence, a new plant was built in a hidden location near Berlin in the same year. Like the Nazis, the chief of the board of management at Daimler-Benz assumed that the war would be short and that the company would be able to resume producing civilian automobiles quickly. By 1941, the company began to realize that the war was going to be a long one. The production of civilian cars in Daimler-Benz production facilities virtually stopped by 1942.As production demands increased, Daimler-Benz began to hire women to work in their plants. These women were recruited to take the place of the men who were being called to the front in high numbers. Soon, even the women could not keep up with the rising demands of production. Daimler-Benz then employed the use of forced laborers from Western Europe. These laborers included prisoners of war who had been captured and transported from the front as well as civilians who had been abducted from towns and villages. Daimler-Benz also used the prisoners of concentration camps that had been built near to their production plants. The company never denied that the people who worked in their factories during the war were treated inhumanely. Prisoners of war lived in prison conditions and were housed in barracks. Germany had ratified the Geneva Convention in 1929 and had agreed to accept a certain level of humanitarian treatment for prisoners of war. This treatment was more often than not reserved from Allied prisoners of war. Laborers who were sent from concentration camps were monitored by the SS in Daimler-Benzs facilities, and they were given to Daimler-Benz in exchange for money.After the war was over, Daimler-Benz did not hide its links with the Nazis and the area concentration camps. The company became actively involved in the Remembrance, Responsibility and Future initiative created by the German Industry Foundation in 2000.AFTER THE WARThe Potsdam Agreement of 1945 required the demilitarization of the German state. This included Germany returning to its pre-war borders. It also required the breakdown of all military operations as well as the payment of reparations for damages. Industry that had been requisitioned by the Nazis was included in the demilitarization process because they had produced armaments during the war.Daimler-Benz was one of many industries that was deconstructed after the end of the war. As a part of the Potsdam Agreement, all of their overseas assets were confiscated. These assets were then sold to begin to pay Germanys share of the post-war reparations. Daimler-Benz had built themselves a large international network during the interwar period that was then dismantled by the Allied partnership. After 1945, they found their company to be in the same place that it had been 20 years before at the end of World War II.The denazification that took place after the war changed up the management at Daimler-Benz. Otto Hoppe, who had been forced out because of his marriage to a Jewish woman in 1942, was invited back to the board in 1945. The major Daimler-Benz plant was put to work as a repair center for Allied military vehicles. It took nearly a year to get permission from the Americans to begin to produce automobiles again. It took a further two years to restore the plant. Reconstruction of Daimler-Benzs operational facilities was not fully complete unt il 1951, nearly 6 years after the end of the war.Despite the slow initial movement, Daimler-Benz began to resume production at all of its German plants by the year 1947. Two of the plants continued to produce trucks. Two other facilities saw their production areas totally destroyed and had to be rebuilt. Despite their total deconstruction after the war and the financial difficulties that could only be resolved by currency reform, Daimler-Benz began to show signs of making a profit only three years after the war ended in 1948 and 1949.WORLDWIDE GROWTHAfter the company was rebuilt, it grew quickly and broke sales records. Their growth was not only due to domestic interest but also to exports to foreign customers. Part of this growth was also the direct result of the German Wirtschaftswunder, otherwise known as the Miracle on the Rhine.After the currency restructuring of 1948, West Germanys economy enjoyed a period of fantastic industrial growth as well as low inflation. This was in st ark contrast the economic depression and out of control inflation that Germany saw after the end of the First World War.In 1948, a currency change was negotiated from the Reichsmark to the Deutsche Mark. This period of growth was called the German Economic Miracle, or the Wirtschaftswunder. Daimler-Benz thrived during this period of German history. In 1954, Daimler-Benz began reaching turnovers of over a billion marks each year. The amount of Mercedes-Benz automobiles sold during this time became one of the symbols of the German Wirtschaftswunder.Until the 1950s, Daimler-Benz was forced to rely upon independent sales distributors across the world to take care of its products. This process was risky and inefficient, so they began to expand their sales network. They started by expanding their networks within Europe and by 1955 they already had 178 general distributors across the world. Daimler-Benz lost much of its international infrastructure during the post-war American-led restruct uring and the years of economic growth helped them to regain their status as an automotive dealer for the global market.Daimler-Benz took this opportunity to expand their production facilities to the international market. This served two purposes. Not only were they able to take advantage of less expensive costs of production by moving abroad but some governments began to require a local production plant before they would grant an import license. As a result, Daimler-Benz began a period of rapid international expansion. They opened plants in Brazil, Argentina, and India. All of these governments required the use of local resources in exchange for an import license. They also began to expand the number of plants to include production facilities in Iran, Turkey, and South Africa.One of the largest factors of the companys success during this period was that it was successfully able to breakthrough into the American market. Daimler-Benz of North America was established in 1955. Daimler- Benz began to work with Max Hoffman, an Austrian importer of luxury cars, which was based in New York. It was Hoffman who suggested the purchase of the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gull Wing to his dealers across American. The car was so popular in American that 80% of all of the 300SL vehicles produced were sold to American customers. The 300SL Gull Wing became the first Mercedes-Benz to thrive in an international market.Motorsport also helped establish the name of Mercedes-Benz as a luxury vehicle for the sophisticated client. Daimler-Benz put together teams and vehicles for some of the most well-known races in motorsports. They sent cars to the Carrera Panamericana Mexico as well as the Grand Prix racing circuits. Their stylish success on the track began to build them an undeniable reputation for being a technologically advanced luxury vehicleThe companys commercial vehicles also helped propel their growth in the post-war period. They began to ramp up their production of commercial vehicl es as soon as they were allowed to begin production again. They introduced the Mercedes-Benz L 3250 in the year 1949. The establishment of the Federal Republic of Germany was also finalized in 1949. The new republic required a new system of public transport and Daimler-Benz was more than happy to provide the busses and trucks that the new state required.A STABLE LEADERThe economic boom of the previous decade set Daimler-Benz up for a secure and stable ride through the 1960s. In the 1970s, the automotive industry suffered from instability primarily because of the 1973 oil crisis. It was not just the scarcity of oil that left an impact on manufacturers. Many governments began to apply pressure on manufacturers to create cars that were fuel-efficient to move away from their dependence on foreign oil. Yet, Daimler-Benz held its ground while the industry changed, remaining highly ranked internationally. The company also became the leader of luxury cars as well as buses and trucks in Euro pe.The oil crisis of 1973 was the result of an oil embargo by the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries. Oil rose significantly during this period from $3 per barrel to almost $12. The oil crisis was the direct response to the American involvement in the Yom Kippur War. OAPEC launched the embargo to protest the United States continuing to supply arms to Israel. The oil embargo was placed against the US, UK, Canada, Japan and the Netherlands. Thankfully, Daimler-Benz was so diversified that they were not seriously affected by the oil embargo, which was mainly directed at the United States.Instead of continuing their international growth during this period, Daimler-Benz began to expand from within their organization. They added the expansion of several plants during the 1960s and 1970s. They also considered new products. While they continued to produce luxury products, they wanted to find a method of diversification. Despite their financial stability, there were some majo r changes within the leadership at Daimler-Benz. A 14 percent share of the company was sold to the Government of Kuwait, and another 29 percent share was sold to Deutsche Bank.GLOBAL TECHNOLOGYDaimler-Benz found substantial growth from the end of the 1950s. After years of stable business punctuated by the occasional oil crisis, Daimler-Benz knew that in order to keep the market share that they had earned, they would have to continue to innovate. This spirit of innovation has moved with the company since its inception in the late 19th century and continued for over 100 years through the last decades of the 20th century. Only three of the dozens of technological advances made during this period are highlighted below:Daimler-Benz began producing CFC-free climate controlled vehicles well before any other automotive company. They recognized that the chemicals used in CFC automators were both unfriendly to the driver and unfriendly to the environment.The Control Area Network is the commun ications system that links all of the systems in a car together so that it can operate at maximum efficiency. Daimler-Benz began to make this a standard feature in their vehicles in 1992.This technology was created by Bosch for industrial uses, but Daimler-Benz adapted it for their luxury vehicles years before any other manufacturer considered a possibility.The smart key system that many drivers take advantage of today was invented by Siemens in the 90s and then adapted and introduced into the automotive industry in the Mercedes-Benz S-Class in 1998. Daimler-Benz was awarded the patent for their keyless entry technology in 1997.Daimler-Benz has seen many changes over the last century. Since 2007, the company has been known as Daimler AG. The company has persevered through adversity and relied on its business acumen and long history of innovation. Today, Mercedes-Benz is still world-renowned for its incredible engineering and supreme luxury.

Thursday, May 21, 2020

How Jackie Robinson Changed Baseball. Jackie Robinson Story

How Jackie Robinson changed baseball Jackie Robinson story is single handedly one of the most inspirational stories about battling segregation laws, and racism. He not only was one of the best baseball players of his time, but he had to play baseball while being the most hated man in the league because of his skin color. Jackie was the first black man to play baseball in a white league for the Brooklyn Dodgers, in 1946 (source 1), he took a very big leap of faith getting himself into that league, well knowing he was going to be treated like a human garbage. He took so much abuse from the league trying to change the views on colored people in the eyes of white people. This seemed like a difficult to impossible task in the 1940’s, but†¦show more content†¦Not only did he participate in baseball but he also played football, basketball, and track all the the college level. He played for Pasadena Junior College in Colorado. He was named the region s Most Valuable Player in baseball in 1938 for his college. At this point There was nothing in the world that could bring Jackie s self esteem down, or so he thought. People from around town made several comments implying that jackie was not a good athlete because of his skin. He was told that he would never be able to compete with a white person. This struck a hateful flame in jackie s heart. He knew he was better than most white athletes, and he felt disrespected because of how much work he had put in to be the athlete he was. After he finished his schooling in Colorado Jackie continued his education at the University of California, Los Angeles, playing football. This is where he became the university s first student to win varsity letters in four sports. In 1941, despite his athletic success, Robinson was forced to leave UCLA just shy of graduation due to financial hardship. He moved to Honolulu, Hawaii, where he played football for the semi-professional Honolulu Bears. His season with the Bears was cut short when the United States entere d into World War II. Jackies time as a war veteran From 1942 to 1944, Robinson served as a second lieutenant in the United States Army. He attended boot camp at Fort Hood in Texas,Show MoreRelatedHow did Jackie Robinson Overcome Racial Discrimination in Sports1119 Words   |  5 PagesHave you ever been protested and demonstrated against? Jackie Robinson felt the outcry of America during his baseball career. Fighting not only for his future, but also for the overall well-being of his sport, Robinson received death threats for his efforts. On a daily basis, this disciplined African man fought the pressures of hatred toward his entire race. As a segregated country, America saw major league baseball as a white man’s sport. Robinson was the outlier in an otherwise American â€Å"traditionRead MoreJackie Robinsons Leadership Style1441 Words   |  6 Pageslives.†- Jackie Robinson A true leader is someone who people willingly follow and listen to as well as someone who has the ability to influence and motivate others. An outstanding example of a great leader is Jackie Robinson. On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson shocked the world and changed not only the history of sports, but changed America. Facing the criticism, ignoring the racial slurs, and following his true passion, Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball. JackRead MoreWhat Factors s Robinson s Background And Character Made Him The Best Choice?941 Words   |  4 Pagesthe best choice to carry out Rickey’s revolution? Baseball is one of the nations pastimes, and accepting a black man playing baseball made it easier to see integration in more important instances. Branch Rickey was an innovative MLB executive who had high hopes for Robinson. Rickey saw the qualities that Jackie Robinson possessed and his hope was that he could use Jack to help break the color barrier. Respect and equality was important in Robinson s career and he knew that blacks needed to be acceptedRead MoreJackie Robinson s Influence On Baseball And America1392 Words   |  6 PagesJackie Robinson’s Influence in Baseball and America Baseball has been known as America’s great sport since the 1920’s. Many people love to watch the games and create their own fantasy teams because they look up to the wide, diverse players on each team. Every team consists of males of different races and this helps bring culture into the great game. Having such a big diversity in one sport makes it easier for more people to enjoy because there is something in it for every person. However, baseballRead MoreCivil Rights Movement : Jackie Robinson1477 Words   |  6 Pages60s. During this time period Baseball was â€Å"America’s Pastime, â€Å"and a major social get together for white Americans. However in 1947 both of these event were combined when the Brooklyn Dodgers gave Jackie Robinson a chance to play professional baseball. Jackie Robinson is the target of my biography. Robinson not only was the first African American baseball player, but he also had a hall of fame career, and eventually had his number reti red by all of Major League Baseball. It is important to know aboutRead MoreEssay on Integration in Major League Baseball1039 Words   |  5 PagesWhen asked to describe a baseball the first word generally voiced is white, and before April 15, 1947 that is exactly what the game of baseball was, white. â€Å"There is no law against Negroes playing with white teams, or whites with colored clubs, but neither has invited the other for the obvious reason they prefer to draw their talent from their own ranks† (‘42’). These were the feelings of people living in 1947, that blacks and whites were not meant to play baseball together. Then, why decades earlierRead MoreA Lesson Before Dying By Ernest Gaines869 Words   |  4 PagesIn the story there are real people that Ernest Gaines alludes to. Ernest Gaines makes an allusion to Joe Louis and Jackie Robinson. Beside these two, Mamie Till also stepped up and was audacious. They were all fearless and gave hope to many other people because of what they were doing. These heroes took a stand against society and changed the world for everyone. A hero isn’t just Superman but someone who stands up for what they believe in and is a sense of hope for everyone. Jackie Robinson was theRead More Jackie Robinson Essay1698 Words   |  7 Pages Baseball has always been America’s national pastime. In the early and all the way into the mid 50’s, baseball was America and America was baseball. The only thing lacking in the great game was the absence of African American players and the presence of an all white sport. America still wasn’t friendly or accepted the African American race and many still held great prejudice towards them. All this would change when the general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Branch Rickey decided he was going toRead MoreJackie Robinson1707 Words   |  7 PagesBaseball has always been Americas national pastime. In the early and all the way into the mid 50s, baseball was America and America was baseball. The only thing lacking in the great game was the absence of African America n players and the presence of an all white sport. America still wasnt friendly or accepted the African American race and many still held great prejudice towards them. All this would change when the general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Branch Rickey decided he was going toRead MoreJackie Robinson was also known as Jack Rossevelt Robinson. Jackie Robinson had very many700 Words   |  3 PagesJackie Robinson was also known as Jack Rossevelt Robinson. Jackie Robinson had very many struggles; Jackie was drafted and assigned to Fort Riley, Kansas, where he faced racial discrimination on a daily basis, he was the first African American in baseball, transformed the face of American sports forever, and his father abandoned the family when Jackie was an infant, and forced his mother and four older siblings to join the Great Migration of the time and move to California. Jackie was born on

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

How Accountability Is Important For Healthcare Services...

1.0 Introduction Before introducing the topic, it is essential to understand what accountability is. In this regard, it can be stated that the term ‘Accountability’ signifies an image of transparency as well as trustworthiness. In relation to this, it can be argued that in different dimension the meaning of accountability is usually differ. However, the real meaning of accountability can be referred as an answerability, which signifies that having an obligation of answering or clarifying regarding the selected decision and/ or action. In this context, more specifically it can be stated that accountability denotes having an obligation of answering to hierarchical superiors regarding information and/or narrative description regarding the†¦show more content†¦In relation to this, it can be mentioned that in the contemporary era healthcare organizations and healthcare professionals are usually facing varied new as well as evolving challenges in terms of healthcare requirements, evol ving diseases, ageing population related discrepancies and management related issues among others (Beelitz 2015). At the same time, it can be mentioned that healthcare organizations are also witnessing varied challenges in terms of new regulations, financial constraints and establishing efficient best practice related problems. In this particular assignment, the objective is to critical analysis the accountability as well as responsiveness strategies, which may usually assist Queensland healthcare reform to ensure the relevant work practice within the healthcare system. 2.0 Discussion 2.1 Gaps in Health Services According to the report of Butt (2010), it is identified that in the modern era, Australian healthcare system has faced several challenges in terms of evolving chronic diseases and critical illness. At the same time, the government also has witnessed obstacles for its fiscal services and financial resources related aspects, which has influenced the performance of the healthcare system in diversified manner. As an effect, it is also identified that the overall quality of healthcare system has disrupted in eight different states of Australia. In this regard, in order to identify the potential cause, it is

Abraham Lincoln and American History Free Essays

Abraham Lincoln was an important part of American history. He ended slavery and helped America through the civil war. Abraham Lincoln was one of the truly great men of all time. We will write a custom essay sample on Abraham Lincoln and American History or any similar topic only for you Order Now Even as a boy, Lincoln showed ability as a speaker. He often amused himself and others by imitating some preacher or politician who had spoken in the area. People liked to gather at the general store in the crossroads village of Gentryville. Lincoln’s gift for telling stories made him a favorite with the people there. In spite of his youth, he was well known in his neighborhood. In 1834, Lincoln again ran for the legislature. He had become better known by this time, and won election as a Whig. He served four successive two-year terms in the lower house of the Illinois General Assembly. During his first term, he met a young Democratic legislator, Stephen A. Douglas. Lincoln quickly came to the front in the legislature. He was witty and ready in debate. His skill in party management enabled him to become the Whig floor leader at the beginning of his second term. He took leading parts in the establishment of the Bank of Illinois and in the adoption of a plan for a system of railroads and canals. This plan broke down after the Panic of 1837. Lincoln also led a successful campaign for moving the state capital from Vandalia to Springfield. While in the legislature, Lincoln made his first public statement on slavery. In 1837, the legislature passed by an overwhelming majority resolutions condemning abolition societies. These societies urged freedom for slaves. Lincoln and another legislator, Dan Stone, filed a protest. They admitted that Congress had no power to interfere with slavery in the states where it existed. They believed â€Å"the promulgation of abolition doctrines tend rather to increase than abate its evils. *1 Their protest arose from the legislature’s failure to call slavery an evil practice. Lincoln and Stone declared that â€Å"the institution of slavery is founded on both injustice and bad policy. â€Å"*2 Later, Lincoln continued with his dream to become part of the law. He wanted to become president. On March 4, 1861, Lincoln took the oath of office and became the 16th President of the United States. In his inaugural address, Lincoln denied that he had any intention of interfering with slavery in states where the Constitution protected it. He urged the preservation of the Union. Lincoln warned that he would use the full power of the nation to â€Å"hold, occupy, and possess† the â€Å"property and places†*3 belonging to the federal government. By â€Å"property and places,† he meant forts, arsenals, and custom houses. Lincoln’s closing passage had great beauty and literary power. He appealed to â€Å"the mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land. † The attack on Fort Sumter marked the start of the Civil War. Lincoln met the crisis with energetic action. He called out the militia to suppress the â€Å"insurrection. He proclaimed a blockade of Southern ports, and expanded the army beyond the limit set by law. He then led the United States during the Civil War (1861-1865), which was the greatest crisis in U. S. history. During the Civil War, Lincoln’s first task was to win the war. He had to view nearly all other matters in relation to the war. It was â€Å"the progress of our arms,† he once said, â€Å"upon which all else depends. † But Lincoln was a peace-loving man who had earlier described military glory as â€Å"that attractive rainbow, that rises in showers of blood–that serpent’s eye that charms to destroy. *4 The Civil War was by far the bloodiest war in U. S. history. Lincoln became a remarkable war leader. Some historians believe he was the chief architect of the Union’s victorious military strategy. This strategy called for Union armies to advance against the enemy on all fronts at the same time. Lincoln also insisted that the objective of the Union armies should be the destruction of opposing forces, not the conquest of territory. Lincoln changed generals several times because he could not find one who would fight the war the way he wanted it fought. When he finally found such a general, Ulysses S. Grant, Lincoln stood firmly behind him. Lincoln’s second great task was to keep up Northern morale through the horrible war in which many relatives in the North and South fought against one another. He understood that the Union’s resources vastly exceeded those of the Confederacy, and that the Union would eventually triumph if it remained dedicated to victory. For this reason, Lincoln used his great writing and speechmaking abilities to spur on his people. If the Union had been destroyed, the United States could have become two, or possibly more, nations. These nations separately could not have become as prosperous and important as the United States is today. By preserving the Union, Lincoln influenced the course of world history. By ending slavery, he helped assure the moral strength of the United States. His own life story, too, has been important. He rose from humble origin to the nation’s highest office. What did Abraham Lincolns Emancipation Proclamation do to help the Civil War? It declared freedom for slaves in all areas of the Confederacy that were still in rebellion against the Union. The proclamation also provided for the use of blacks in the Union Army and Navy. As a result, it greatly influenced the North’s victory in the war. The 11 states of the Confederacy seceded from the Union in 1860 and 1861. They seceded primarily because they feared Lincoln would restrict their right to do as they chose about the question of black slavery. The North entered the Civil War only to reunite the nation, not to end slavery. During the first half of the war, abolitionists and some Union military leaders urged Lincoln to issue a proclamation freeing the slaves. They argued that such a policy would help the North because slaves were contributing greatly to the Confederate war effort. By doing most of the South’s farming and factory work, slaves made whites available for the Confederate Army. Lincoln agreed with the abolitionists’ view of slavery. He once declared that â€Å"if slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. â€Å"*5 But early in the war, Lincoln believed that if he freed the slaves, he would divide the North. Lincoln feared that four slave-owning border states; Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri, would secede if he adopted such a policy. In July 1862, with the war going badly for the North, Congress passed a law freeing all Confederate slaves who came into Union lines. At about that same time, Lincoln decided to change his stand on slavery. But he waited for a Union military victory, so that his decision would not appear to be a desperate act. On Sept. 22, 1862, five days after Union forces won the Battle of Antietam, Lincoln issued a preliminary proclamation. It stated that if the rebelling states did not return to the Union by Jan. 1, 1863, he would declare their slaves to be â€Å"forever free. The South rejected Lincoln’s policy, and so he issued the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863. Lincoln took this action as commander in chief of the Army and Navy of the United States. He called it â€Å"a fit and necessary war measure. † The Emancipation Proclamation did not actually free a single slave, because it affected only areas under Confederate control. It excluded slaves in the border states and in such Southern areas under Union control as Tennessee and parts of Louisiana and Virginia. But it did lead to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. This amendment, which became law on Dec. 18, 1865, ended slavery in all parts of the United States. As the abolitionists had predicted, the Emancipation Proclamation strengthened the North’s war effort and weakened the South’s. By the end of the war, more than 500,000 slaves had fled to freedom behind Northern lines. Many of them joined the Union Army or Navy or worked for the armed forces as laborers. By allowing blacks to serve in the Army and Navy, the Emancipation Proclamation helped solve the North’s problem of declining enlistments. About 200,000 black soldiers and sailors, many of them former slaves, served in the armed forces. They helped the North win the war. The Emancipation Proclamation also hurt the South by discouraging Britain and France from entering the war. Both of those nations depended on the South to supply them with cotton, and the Confederacy hoped that they would fight on its side. But the proclamation made the war a fight against slavery. Lincoln†s decisions and Emancipation Proclamation led to the 15th amendment which freed slaves. Without it, life today would be much different. He changed life for all Americans, black and white. How did the Pacific Railroad Act have an impact on American History? It provided for the building of the nation’s first transcontinental rail line. Abraham Lincoln was in office when the Pacific Railroad Act was signed. He made a huge impact by signing the act. It was the first step to trading with other states that were far apart and new ways of transportation. States could now trade meat and states could focus on the products that are most practical for their part of the country. The act gave two companies responsibility for building the railroad. The Union Pacific was to start laying track westward from a point near Omaha. The Central Pacific Railroad was to lay track eastward from Sacramento. Congress granted both railroads large tracts of land and millions of dollars in government loans. Work began on the Central Pacific track in 1863 and on the Union Pacific in 1865. The railroads faced the gigantic task of crossing the rugged Rockies and the towering Sierra Nevada. To obtain the necessary labor, the Central Pacific hired thousands of Chinese immigrants to work on the railroad. Thousands of European immigrants worked on the Union Pacific. On May 10, 1869, the tracks of the two railroads finally met at Promontory, Utah. North America became the first continent to have a rail line from coast to coast. By the end of the 1800’s, the United States had five transcontinental rail lines. The Canadian Pacific Railway (now CP Rail) completed Canada’s first transcontinental line in 1885. It extended from Montreal, Quebec, to Vancouver, British Columbia. The completion of these rail lines opened vast regions of the continent to settlement and trade. How did the sayings of Abraham Lincoln help people? Abraham gave many speeches in his life that inspired people to be all that they can be and do what is right. Gettysburg Address is a short speech that United States President Abraham Lincoln delivered during the American Civil War at the site of the Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania. He delivered the address on Nov. 19, 1863, at ceremonies to dedicate a part of the battlefield as a cemetery for those who had lost their lives in the battle. The principal speaker was Edward Everett, one of the greatest orators of his day. He spoke for two hours. Lincoln was asked to say a few words, and spoke for about two minutes. Lincoln wrote the address to help ensure that the battle would be seen as a great Union triumph and to define for the people of the Northern States the purpose in fighting the war. Some historians think his simple and inspired words, which are among the best remembered in American history, reshaped the nation by defining it as one people dedicated to one principle–that of equality. Lincoln wrote five different versions of the speech. He wrote most of the first version in Washington, D. C. , and probably completed it at Gettysburg. He probably wrote the second version at Gettysburg on the evening before he delivered his address. He held this second version in his hand during the address. But he made several changes as he spoke. The most important change was to add the phrase â€Å"under God† after the word â€Å"nation† in the last sentence. Lincoln also added that phrase to the three versions of the address that he wrote after the ceremonies at Gettysburg. Lincoln wrote the final version of the address–the fifth written version–in 1864. This version also differed somewhat from the speech he actually gave, but it was the only copy he signed. It is carved on a stone plaque in the Lincoln Memorial. Many false stories have grown up about this famous speech. One story says that the people of Lincoln’s time did not appreciate the speech. But the reaction of the nation’s newspapers largely followed party lines. Most of the newspapers that backed the Republican Party, the party to which Lincoln belonged, liked the speech. A majority of the newspapers that supported the Democratic Party did not. Edward Everett, the principal speaker at the dedication, wrote to Lincoln: â€Å"I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion in two hours as you did in two minutes. *6 Abrahams two minute speech had more of an impact that a two hour speech. Lincoln touched many hearts and others despised him. It does not matter if they liked him or not, they were still affected by his words and actions. Abraham Lincoln affected the U. S. in many different ways. He led the United States during the Civil War, one of the most brutal battles in history. Lincoln helped end slavery in the nation and helped keep the American Union from splitting apart during the war. Lincoln thus believed that he proved to the world that democracy can be a lasting form of government. Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, second inaugural address, and many of his other speeches and writings are classic statements of democratic beliefs and goals. Lincoln, a Republican, was the first member of his party to become President. He was assassinated near the end of the Civil War and was succeeded by Vice President Andrew Johnson. Lincoln was the first U. S. President to be assassinated. Without President Lincoln life today would be much different. We have him to thank for a lot of the great accomplishments in history. How to cite Abraham Lincoln and American History, Essay examples

Abraham Lincoln and American History Free Essays

Abraham Lincoln was an important part of American history. He ended slavery and helped America through the civil war. Abraham Lincoln was one of the truly great men of all time. We will write a custom essay sample on Abraham Lincoln and American History or any similar topic only for you Order Now Even as a boy, Lincoln showed ability as a speaker. He often amused himself and others by imitating some preacher or politician who had spoken in the area. People liked to gather at the general store in the crossroads village of Gentryville. Lincoln’s gift for telling stories made him a favorite with the people there. In spite of his youth, he was well known in his neighborhood. In 1834, Lincoln again ran for the legislature. He had become better known by this time, and won election as a Whig. He served four successive two-year terms in the lower house of the Illinois General Assembly. During his first term, he met a young Democratic legislator, Stephen A. Douglas. Lincoln quickly came to the front in the legislature. He was witty and ready in debate. His skill in party management enabled him to become the Whig floor leader at the beginning of his second term. He took leading parts in the establishment of the Bank of Illinois and in the adoption of a plan for a system of railroads and canals. This plan broke down after the Panic of 1837. Lincoln also led a successful campaign for moving the state capital from Vandalia to Springfield. While in the legislature, Lincoln made his first public statement on slavery. In 1837, the legislature passed by an overwhelming majority resolutions condemning abolition societies. These societies urged freedom for slaves. Lincoln and another legislator, Dan Stone, filed a protest. They admitted that Congress had no power to interfere with slavery in the states where it existed. They believed â€Å"the promulgation of abolition doctrines tend rather to increase than abate its evils. *1 Their protest arose from the legislature’s failure to call slavery an evil practice. Lincoln and Stone declared that â€Å"the institution of slavery is founded on both injustice and bad policy. â€Å"*2 Later, Lincoln continued with his dream to become part of the law. He wanted to become president. On March 4, 1861, Lincoln took the oath of office and became the 16th President of the United States. In his inaugural address, Lincoln denied that he had any intention of interfering with slavery in states where the Constitution protected it. He urged the preservation of the Union. Lincoln warned that he would use the full power of the nation to â€Å"hold, occupy, and possess† the â€Å"property and places†*3 belonging to the federal government. By â€Å"property and places,† he meant forts, arsenals, and custom houses. Lincoln’s closing passage had great beauty and literary power. He appealed to â€Å"the mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land. † The attack on Fort Sumter marked the start of the Civil War. Lincoln met the crisis with energetic action. He called out the militia to suppress the â€Å"insurrection. He proclaimed a blockade of Southern ports, and expanded the army beyond the limit set by law. He then led the United States during the Civil War (1861-1865), which was the greatest crisis in U. S. history. During the Civil War, Lincoln’s first task was to win the war. He had to view nearly all other matters in relation to the war. It was â€Å"the progress of our arms,† he once said, â€Å"upon which all else depends. † But Lincoln was a peace-loving man who had earlier described military glory as â€Å"that attractive rainbow, that rises in showers of blood–that serpent’s eye that charms to destroy. *4 The Civil War was by far the bloodiest war in U. S. history. Lincoln became a remarkable war leader. Some historians believe he was the chief architect of the Union’s victorious military strategy. This strategy called for Union armies to advance against the enemy on all fronts at the same time. Lincoln also insisted that the objective of the Union armies should be the destruction of opposing forces, not the conquest of territory. Lincoln changed generals several times because he could not find one who would fight the war the way he wanted it fought. When he finally found such a general, Ulysses S. Grant, Lincoln stood firmly behind him. Lincoln’s second great task was to keep up Northern morale through the horrible war in which many relatives in the North and South fought against one another. He understood that the Union’s resources vastly exceeded those of the Confederacy, and that the Union would eventually triumph if it remained dedicated to victory. For this reason, Lincoln used his great writing and speechmaking abilities to spur on his people. If the Union had been destroyed, the United States could have become two, or possibly more, nations. These nations separately could not have become as prosperous and important as the United States is today. By preserving the Union, Lincoln influenced the course of world history. By ending slavery, he helped assure the moral strength of the United States. His own life story, too, has been important. He rose from humble origin to the nation’s highest office. What did Abraham Lincolns Emancipation Proclamation do to help the Civil War? It declared freedom for slaves in all areas of the Confederacy that were still in rebellion against the Union. The proclamation also provided for the use of blacks in the Union Army and Navy. As a result, it greatly influenced the North’s victory in the war. The 11 states of the Confederacy seceded from the Union in 1860 and 1861. They seceded primarily because they feared Lincoln would restrict their right to do as they chose about the question of black slavery. The North entered the Civil War only to reunite the nation, not to end slavery. During the first half of the war, abolitionists and some Union military leaders urged Lincoln to issue a proclamation freeing the slaves. They argued that such a policy would help the North because slaves were contributing greatly to the Confederate war effort. By doing most of the South’s farming and factory work, slaves made whites available for the Confederate Army. Lincoln agreed with the abolitionists’ view of slavery. He once declared that â€Å"if slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. â€Å"*5 But early in the war, Lincoln believed that if he freed the slaves, he would divide the North. Lincoln feared that four slave-owning border states; Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri, would secede if he adopted such a policy. In July 1862, with the war going badly for the North, Congress passed a law freeing all Confederate slaves who came into Union lines. At about that same time, Lincoln decided to change his stand on slavery. But he waited for a Union military victory, so that his decision would not appear to be a desperate act. On Sept. 22, 1862, five days after Union forces won the Battle of Antietam, Lincoln issued a preliminary proclamation. It stated that if the rebelling states did not return to the Union by Jan. 1, 1863, he would declare their slaves to be â€Å"forever free. The South rejected Lincoln’s policy, and so he issued the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863. Lincoln took this action as commander in chief of the Army and Navy of the United States. He called it â€Å"a fit and necessary war measure. † The Emancipation Proclamation did not actually free a single slave, because it affected only areas under Confederate control. It excluded slaves in the border states and in such Southern areas under Union control as Tennessee and parts of Louisiana and Virginia. But it did lead to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. This amendment, which became law on Dec. 18, 1865, ended slavery in all parts of the United States. As the abolitionists had predicted, the Emancipation Proclamation strengthened the North’s war effort and weakened the South’s. By the end of the war, more than 500,000 slaves had fled to freedom behind Northern lines. Many of them joined the Union Army or Navy or worked for the armed forces as laborers. By allowing blacks to serve in the Army and Navy, the Emancipation Proclamation helped solve the North’s problem of declining enlistments. About 200,000 black soldiers and sailors, many of them former slaves, served in the armed forces. They helped the North win the war. The Emancipation Proclamation also hurt the South by discouraging Britain and France from entering the war. Both of those nations depended on the South to supply them with cotton, and the Confederacy hoped that they would fight on its side. But the proclamation made the war a fight against slavery. Lincoln†s decisions and Emancipation Proclamation led to the 15th amendment which freed slaves. Without it, life today would be much different. He changed life for all Americans, black and white. How did the Pacific Railroad Act have an impact on American History? It provided for the building of the nation’s first transcontinental rail line. Abraham Lincoln was in office when the Pacific Railroad Act was signed. He made a huge impact by signing the act. It was the first step to trading with other states that were far apart and new ways of transportation. States could now trade meat and states could focus on the products that are most practical for their part of the country. The act gave two companies responsibility for building the railroad. The Union Pacific was to start laying track westward from a point near Omaha. The Central Pacific Railroad was to lay track eastward from Sacramento. Congress granted both railroads large tracts of land and millions of dollars in government loans. Work began on the Central Pacific track in 1863 and on the Union Pacific in 1865. The railroads faced the gigantic task of crossing the rugged Rockies and the towering Sierra Nevada. To obtain the necessary labor, the Central Pacific hired thousands of Chinese immigrants to work on the railroad. Thousands of European immigrants worked on the Union Pacific. On May 10, 1869, the tracks of the two railroads finally met at Promontory, Utah. North America became the first continent to have a rail line from coast to coast. By the end of the 1800’s, the United States had five transcontinental rail lines. The Canadian Pacific Railway (now CP Rail) completed Canada’s first transcontinental line in 1885. It extended from Montreal, Quebec, to Vancouver, British Columbia. The completion of these rail lines opened vast regions of the continent to settlement and trade. How did the sayings of Abraham Lincoln help people? Abraham gave many speeches in his life that inspired people to be all that they can be and do what is right. Gettysburg Address is a short speech that United States President Abraham Lincoln delivered during the American Civil War at the site of the Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania. He delivered the address on Nov. 19, 1863, at ceremonies to dedicate a part of the battlefield as a cemetery for those who had lost their lives in the battle. The principal speaker was Edward Everett, one of the greatest orators of his day. He spoke for two hours. Lincoln was asked to say a few words, and spoke for about two minutes. Lincoln wrote the address to help ensure that the battle would be seen as a great Union triumph and to define for the people of the Northern States the purpose in fighting the war. Some historians think his simple and inspired words, which are among the best remembered in American history, reshaped the nation by defining it as one people dedicated to one principle–that of equality. Lincoln wrote five different versions of the speech. He wrote most of the first version in Washington, D. C. , and probably completed it at Gettysburg. He probably wrote the second version at Gettysburg on the evening before he delivered his address. He held this second version in his hand during the address. But he made several changes as he spoke. The most important change was to add the phrase â€Å"under God† after the word â€Å"nation† in the last sentence. Lincoln also added that phrase to the three versions of the address that he wrote after the ceremonies at Gettysburg. Lincoln wrote the final version of the address–the fifth written version–in 1864. This version also differed somewhat from the speech he actually gave, but it was the only copy he signed. It is carved on a stone plaque in the Lincoln Memorial. Many false stories have grown up about this famous speech. One story says that the people of Lincoln’s time did not appreciate the speech. But the reaction of the nation’s newspapers largely followed party lines. Most of the newspapers that backed the Republican Party, the party to which Lincoln belonged, liked the speech. A majority of the newspapers that supported the Democratic Party did not. Edward Everett, the principal speaker at the dedication, wrote to Lincoln: â€Å"I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion in two hours as you did in two minutes. *6 Abrahams two minute speech had more of an impact that a two hour speech. Lincoln touched many hearts and others despised him. It does not matter if they liked him or not, they were still affected by his words and actions. Abraham Lincoln affected the U. S. in many different ways. He led the United States during the Civil War, one of the most brutal battles in history. Lincoln helped end slavery in the nation and helped keep the American Union from splitting apart during the war. Lincoln thus believed that he proved to the world that democracy can be a lasting form of government. Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, second inaugural address, and many of his other speeches and writings are classic statements of democratic beliefs and goals. Lincoln, a Republican, was the first member of his party to become President. He was assassinated near the end of the Civil War and was succeeded by Vice President Andrew Johnson. Lincoln was the first U. S. President to be assassinated. Without President Lincoln life today would be much different. We have him to thank for a lot of the great accomplishments in history. How to cite Abraham Lincoln and American History, Essay examples

Saturday, April 25, 2020

Pet Overpopulation Epidemic Essay Example

Pet Overpopulation Epidemic Paper The public, government and breeders all have their hand in this catastrophic epidemic. So who is to blame for this epidemic? Since government intervention has caused more harm than foul, what will need to change in order for anything to improve? The pet overpopulation epidemic is not a myth, not something to be swept under the rug or shamelessly forgotten. This epidemic is our making and therefore our responsibility. So where does the problem really lie? One would think its 100% the fault of breeders and those multitudes of litters. But no, that is not the route of the problem, not by a long shot. Breeders are the effect of the problem, and the massive pet overpopulation is the aftermath. Yes, breeders, as a whole, are breeding more litters than there are homes for, yet, they are selling them. So why is that, why are breeders selling their litters when theres a worldwide pet overpopulation problem? Because people do not look at the purchase of a puppy or kitten as a lifelong commitment. Puppies and kittens are so cute, most are purchased on impulse. Who could, after all, resist that cute little face? Yes, the problem lies with the general public who, do not research, and buy these pets without thoroughly thinking it through. We will write a custom essay sample on Pet Overpopulation Epidemic specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Pet Overpopulation Epidemic specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Pet Overpopulation Epidemic specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Without doing their homework on the type of pet they should get, and without taking the time to learn what a dog really needs in order to be that perfect dog. They later Get Rid of their pet, passing them onto rescues or pounds. Later, most will end up Testing Out a different type of pet. The vast majority of people, who adopt a puppy or kitten, do not keep the animal for life. If this were to turn around and most people were to actually keep their pets through the good times and the bad, as they do their own children, the demand for these animals would go down. With less of a demand, breeders would not breed as any litters. Breeders are only breeding as many litters as they do, because people are buying them. The demand for a cute little puppy or kitten is great, because people do not keep the animal for life. Animals are recycled. If a breeder had a litter and could not sell the puppies, they would not keep having litter after litter. People are buying them, so breeders are breeding them. In a perfect world, breeders would breed less and force people to adopt from an animal rescue, but this is not a perfect world. The solution lies with the general public educating themselves, supply and demand, thats the elution. Lessen the demand and the supply will, on its own, lessen. The power lies within each and every one of us. Scripted by Kim Stuart (of the San Mateo ordinance fame) and her continual cross-country junketing preaching her message: The problem is simple: we have too many dogs and cats. Too many for too few homes. Another contributing factor to this huge problem is government intervention. The state run dog pounds make it way took easy to unload the responsibility of owning a pet onto someone else. Most people could Get Rid of their dogs in one day. Almost anyone can take their pets to the pound. It is very easy to Get Rid of a dog or cat at a local state run kill shelter (dog cat pound), but its not so easy to adopt a dog from one. Some years back my cousin went to a state run dog pound near his work and tried to adopt a dog. He was told it was the dogs last day, yes it was going to be killed the next day. My husband told the shelter he wanted to adopt the dog. Upon doing his paperwork he was told he could not adopt the dog because he didnt live in that county. He explained he worked down the street, didnt live in the county but worked there. No, that was not acceptable; he was not allowed to adopt the dog. The pound was going to kill the dog, but would not adopt it out to a man who lived in the next county over. These state run pounds have all kinds of rules and restrictions in place for adopting a pet, but not for dumping one. Yes, they will take your pet, and they will also kill it for you. Know if you take your dog or cat to one of these pounds chances are extremely high it will be dead in a month. The majority of cats and dogs who are taken to this state run kill shelters are not adopted out, but are killed. One might as well save the tax payers some money and kill the animals homeless. Sound harsh? Yes, it is, so dont take your pets to the pound. You took on this responsibility, now you must deal with it without dumping your problems onto someone else. What needs to change, the attitude of the general public. When one decides to buy a cute little puppy or kitten, the decision should be looked at as a 10-15 year commitment. If one cannot, or does not, wish to commit this amount of time to a dog or cat, do not buy a puppy or kitten, and then pass your problem off to someone else when it grows up and the situation does not work out as you envisioned it would. Just eke when one decides to have a human baby, things will not be perfect. The child will not be perfect. They will be expensive and press us to the end with issues to deal with. Dogs and cats are not disposable and they are not all the same. Chances are, a type of dog that will fit into your lifestyle will not be the type of dog that will fit into your neighbors lifestyle. Sometimes there is no ski type of dog that will fit into your lifestyle, and if you want a pet, consider something else, something less demanding. This Reese done before you adopt a pet, it should not be a trial and error With the internet so readily available, there is no excuse for not BEFORE adopting a pet. It should be made harder to dump union off at these state pounds, putting more responsibility on the pee Maybe than people would think twice about buying a puppy or they were not sure if they were ready for the responsibility of o life. These state run shelters are hurting the pet overpopulation more than they are helping. The world would be a better place not an easy place to dump your pets after you got tired of them no kill rescues work with people who think they want to dump needs to be harder for someone to dump an unwanted pet NC back. If you would like to try owning a dog or cat, but are not us dog / cat person, start with a full grown homeless dog or cat rat adopting a puppy or kitten.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

A While vs Awhile

A While vs Awhile A While vs Awhile A While vs Awhile By Ali Hale One of our readers, Robert, wrote to ask Daily Writing Tips: Heres a couple of words I use all the time interchangeably. But are they? a while vs. awhile Help me out, o oracle! No problem, Robert! This one’s pretty easy to grasp: A while is a noun meaning â€Å"a length of time† â€Å"I slept for a while.† (compare with â€Å"I slept for a bit† and â€Å"I slept for three hours†) â€Å"I was away from my desk for a while.† (compare with â€Å"I was away from my desk for two minutes†) Awhile is an adverb, meaning â€Å"for a time,† or literally, â€Å"for a while†. â€Å"I slept awhile before dinner.† (compare with â€Å"I slept deeply before dinner† and â€Å"I slept badly before dinner†.) As you can see, the words can be used almost interchangeably in some cases – but a while needs to be accompanied by a preposition, such as â€Å"for† (â€Å"I slept for a while†) or â€Å"ago† (â€Å"I left work a while ago†). Awhile always means â€Å"for a while†. Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Misused Words category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:Comparative Forms of AdjectivesThe Difference Between "will" and "shall"Shore It Up